A disabled veteran of the Gulf War, Arthur Boorman was told that he would never walk again. Inspired by Diamond Dallas Page’s hybrid yoga, he decided to challenge the impossible. Less than a year later, through hard work and dedication, Boorman beat the odds against him; he was able to walk again. After watching a video about Arthur’s story, my students at the Monarch School,  were in complete shock of his transformation and will to succeed after many failed attempts. The key takeaway for them was that they all have the power to choose what they think. When they take control of their thoughts, they take control of who they are and who they want to be.

A disabled veteran of the Gulf War, Arthur Boorman was told that he would never walk again. Inspired by Diamond Dallas Page’s hybrid yoga, he decided to challenge the impossible. Less than a year later, through hard work and dedication, Boorman beat the odds against him; he was able to walk again.

After watching a video about Arthur’s story, my students at the Monarch School,  were in complete shock of his transformation and will to succeed after many failed attempts. The key takeaway for them was that they all have the power to choose what they think. When they take control of their thoughts, they take control of who they are and who they want to be.

There are 1.1 million American students that drop out of school every year. Personally, I don’t blame them. While we brag about the importance of education, we neglect the individual who must attain it. Based on society’s standards of success, we label the students for what they are, not who they are. This is directly related to where they came from and not the possibility of where they can go. Students easily become blinded, losing their core identity by becoming discouraged to express themselves—their hopes, dreams, and purpose in life. I can’t help but to question, is it our students that are behind, or is it our education system? In middle schools across the country, two out of three eighth graders cannot read or write proficiently. I believe that the main problem is that they are given a story to analyze before they truly understand their own. No one ever takes the time to ask the question, “Who are you?” and more importantly, “Why are you valuable to society?”

There are 1.1 million American students that drop out of school every year. Personally, I don’t blame them. While we brag about the importance of education, we neglect the individual who must attain it. Based on society’s standards of success, we label the students for what they are, not who they are. This is directly related to where they came from and not the possibility of where they can go. Students easily become blinded, losing their core identity by becoming discouraged to express themselves—their hopes, dreams, and purpose in life.

I can’t help but to question, is it our students that are behind, or is it our education system? In middle schools across the country, two out of three eighth graders cannot read or write proficiently. I believe that the main problem is that they are given a story to analyze before they truly understand their own. No one ever takes the time to ask the question, “Who are you?” and more importantly, “Why are you valuable to society?”